Monday, January 11, 2010

Massacre on the Bus

It sure looks like a massacre happened on the bus (aka trailer).

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I'm sure the people driving past us didn't know what to think.

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Looks like something out of a slasher movie, huh?

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Luckily, the sun was going down as we headed home from Stephenville.

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So are you wondering what happened?  Well, we tipped the 2 year old bulls while we were at the arena.  Which means, we cut the ends of their horns off.  It has to be done for safety reasons, safety of other animals and safety for us.

It looks much worse than it really is, I promise.  I was hesitant about posting it but it's part of of the business.  There are rules about how blunt a horn must be in order for the bull to compete.    Plus I realized y'all know how much I care for my animals and wouldn't do anything to cause them intentional harm.

Tadpole is a nice hue of red right now.

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The husband said the boys were still peeved at him this morning.  They wouldn't come up to eat while he was around.  So this evening I went out with a can of cubes to see if they were upset with me.   They ran right up and got their treats.  They still love mama.  Do y'all still love us?

31 comments:

fernvalley01 said...

Yup , we have had that look around here in the past too. All polled cattle now so I get to avoid the bloodbath.
Course we still love ya girl
Hey I hauled a cow carcass to the lab once right through downtown Edmonton (couldn't keep a tarp on so ...) Yup we were hugely popular!

Linda said...

Of course we still love you! Rather have tipped bulls than gored blog friends!

mrscravitz said...

Yep, Still love ya. AND totally appreciate all the stories you tell. It is a way of life. It needs to be done. Agree with what Linda said!

Amy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Amy said...

Still love you! And it's all for safety reasons - what was disheartening for me was when a previous bottle calf of mine - now year and half old cross bred Angus bull calf got his head caught in a gate and ripped one of his horns clean off. That was not a pretty sight! Thanks for sharing another part of the business!

Edited because I forgot how to spell.

Nikker said...

More than EVER! I am glad to see the good, the bad, and the real life! Its no worse than casteration or calving! I've learned so much about the rough stock business since finding this blog...love it, love it, love it!!

Growing Up A Country Girl said...

It's part of the farm life - and may be ugly but that is the way it is... You did have me wonderin' tho' what happened in that trailer! Keep on truckin' on that treadmill - oh the stuff we have to do!!! :)

Crystal Young said...

Thanks for sharing all the stories about agriculture. There are some parts that aren't the prettiest but their is a purpose behind them. Keep up the great work!

www.cdycattle.blogspot.com

Vaquerogirl said...

Oh I've got a great story to tell you, here is the short version- a man that was NOT a cowboy of any variety- came upon a calf that had been dehorned, castrated and then ear marked and brisket marked. The greenhorn was in the military and was patrolling the base where we had a lease. He came tearing up to our rig in his military truck, ashen faced with his eyes a 'rollin in his head. Pointing over his shoulder and screaming " That somebody had 'f'ed up a calf and we should call the 'po-lice".
Ranching is a hard buisness-

Sydney said...

I bet they were peeved!
Good thing they still do love their mama. Don't want you getting blunted.

City girl turned Country Girl said...

I'm glad you remembered that we all DO love you!!! And if you can't show real life then what would be the point?! Definitely would have been an eye catcher LOL!!

ps~ glad they still love their mama HA!!

Goodwife said...

LOL! Anybody who's got animals knows that sometimes there are things you gotta do that ain't so very pleasant! When my kids are less than a week old I burn their horn buds with a hot iron and tag their ears. They scream like you are killin' them! I also use a burdizzo (clamp) on the young billies that I'm not keeping to wether them. They don't like that so much either. The so-called animal rights people usually haven't a clue about anything. Don't worry, you're doin' fine! :)

Cedar View Paint Horses said...

I was the blue-cote guy at castration time when I was a youngin. To hear them beller when you spray that blue cote on their, well, ya know was enough to make you grow tough fast.

Kathy said...

Being a city gal I'm glad your keeping it real. People like me need to know what goes on in the daily care of animals. I never realized they could bleed so much thru their horns. Learned something new today. Thanks, and keep it coming.

P.S. it's no worse then when people docked their dogs tails, and that's not even done for safety reasons.

lifein3dee said...

Ha, they wanted nothing to do with Dad, the meanie! LOL

Country Whispers said...

Not a pretty picture but one that has to be done.
You gotta take a little bad along with the good.

Paula said...

We have to do that with our roping steers also. Boy it is a messy job! That nice little vein that runs right through the horn just shoots a straight shot out and I'm usually the one that takes it in the cheek or something!! hehe. It is gross!

bekah said...

haha that does indeed look awful. Hey, you gotta do what you gotta do.

Jocelyn said...

ewwwwwwwwwwww GAH-ROSS

This does not help my distaste of the moo cow.Blech...

I guess tipped is better than hooked and smoked right?

Farmchick said...

that's the way it goes on the farm and ranch! :) The beautiful things far outweigh the not so beautiful! Have a great evening!! Stop in and say hi! :)

prairierunner said...

Such is life, a little blood, a little urine and a lotta crap! Just curious but do you have to do them again in a couple of years or are they good for life?

Scrappy Doo said...

EWWW Gross
Stil lovin the blog and still gonna follow

lisa said...

A necessary evil! Some one has to do it. The husband burns our calves horns and he hates the job and the last couple of times he has done it he didn't get them done right.

Merri said...

yikes! I would have snuck home with that trailer in the dark too. : )
- The Equestrian Vagabond

AKPonyGirl said...

I pulled one scur off my goat buck's head the other day. Bled like a........stuck pig for several hours. Now I have to get the other one. Be glad your bulls don't smell like a stinky buck.

CTG Ponies said...

Wow, I didn't realize they bled that much. They all survived and still love mama so no worries.

gtyyup said...

Yep, it's a long way from the heart! The story reminds me of when I was young...I'd be walking to the house from the school bus stop and smell the burnin' hair...dad and uncle were brandin' and dehornin' in the barn...blood everywhere!

Shirley said...

Better a little blood on your trailer than on some cowboy's head. Guess I haven't been paying attention- do you only use the weights on the cows, not the bulls because of having to cut the horns back?

Andrea said...

I wonder if while you were driving home if any splattered on cars behind ya!! Ha ha ha ha!! Okay, that was just wrong of me, sorry!! I am glad they still love their momma!!

Tatersmama said...

Of COURSE I still love ya! This is all just a part of life on the farm! It shows that you're doing what's right for your babies, and the fact that you're both giving them a little extra TLC proves that you're a good Momma and Daddy!

Cathy said...

Ive been a lurker for a long time. I'm glad you can step up and show real farm/ranch life. I grew on a dairy farm and during dehorning time for the calves i never dared to bring a friend into the barn because they would freak . It was bloody and messy and necessary for our safety and safety for the other animals. And my town friends just couldn't or wouldn't understand. So thank you for having the courage to show bad with the good.